Tag: orange

Blood Orange Rosemary Sorbet

Blood Orange Sorbet

When I bought our ice cream maker a couple years ago, I didn’t use it at first. I’m not crazy about ice cream although I have  a sweet tooth and I can eat sweets all the time – if it’s frozen I have to be in the mood. Things changed after I made my own first ice cream, I think it was strawberry, very creamy and far better, fruitier and less sweet than most I had tried before.

I always start my ice cream production in spring as I prefer to make it with fresh fruit, strawberry, blueberry, later in the year I use plums as well, everything sweet and aromatic finds its way into my ice cream maker. It’s still quite early in the year and the temperature is far from summery but spring officially starts today, the perfect day to begin the production! Local berries aren’t ripe yet so I have to think of something else. I find my inspiration in a frozen delicacy I love to eat in summer when we’re in Malta, a fruity granita or sorbet! I love to walk along the promenade at the sea in the late afternoon when the sun is more forgiving, a cup of sour lemon granita in my hand, melting as soon as I dip the spoon into the crunchy bits of ice!

Today, it’s not lemon but blood orange. I want to use them as long as they are still juicy and sweet. I’m in the mood for a sorbet with more complex flavours so I add a few chopped needles of rosemary. The result is delicious and the recipe a keeper, I will definitely make another batch soon!

Blood Orange Sorbet

 Blood Orange Rosemary Sorbet 

For 4 big portions of sorbet you need

freshly squeezed blood orange juice 500ml
juice of 1 lemon
icing sugar 50g / 2 ounces
rosemary, finely chopped, 2 teaspoons

Mix the ingredients well and put into an ice cream maker for around 25 minutes until almost frozen. Serve immediately or keep in the freezer.

Blood Orange Sorbet

A Monday Morning Juice with Grapefruit, Banana, Orange and Ginger

Grapefruit, Orange, Banana + Ginger Juice

I have the tendency to become overly excited as soon as the temperature rises above 10°C and the sun comes through for more than a couple hours. I know it’s only the beginning of March but I already feel like spring. I want to get out my summer clothes and jump around in the springy, fresh air. I want to sit outside a café with a glass of chilled white wine, enjoying the warm sun. Unfortunately, there’s still a gap in temperature between my dreams and reality which I don’t want to accept (sometimes) and that’s exactly the problem! I’m prepared for the coldest winter and arctic temperatures, I never get a cold, but at this time of the year, a stone’s throw away from the end of the cold season, I tend to be too carefree and strain my immune system.

To avoid any deficit in vitamins, I start the week off with a powerful juice made of grapefruit, banana, blood orange and ginger. For two glasses of juice (400ml in all), I squeeze 1 pink grapefruit and 3 oranges. I add 1/8 teaspoon of grated ginger and half a banana, mashed smoothly with a fork. You can use a whole one but I didn’t want its taste and sweetness to be too overpowering.

It’s a true energy boost, like my January’s Turmeric and Ginger Blood Orange Juice!

Grapefruit, Orange, Banana + Ginger Juice

 

Grapefruit, Orange, Banana + Ginger Juice

Fougasse Sandwich with Baked Beetroot, Goat Cheese and Thyme

Beetroot + Goat Cheese Fougasse Sandwich

I got really hooked on the roots and syrup combination in the past week. It all started with my ginger honey glazed Navet, yellow turnip fried as vegetarian steaks followed by caramelised maple parsnip with goat cheese combined in a warm salad and I’m still in the mood for sweet and earthy duos, at least one more.

It’s Sandwich Wednesday and the first thing that came into my mind when I looked at the beautiful Fougasse bread I baked yesterday, was a baked beetroot sandwich. My flatbread has strong aromas of orange and sage, perfect to add some more earthy and sweet flavours. There are some beetroots lying on my kitchen window sill, just waiting to be baked in maple syrup and olive oil sprinkled with thyme. I found a kind of thyme at the organic store that I have never seen before, with thick, long leaves. They are stronger in taste compared to the small leaved one, a bit woody. The thin slices of the roots are done after 10 minutes in the oven, soft, syrupy and partly crisp. I let them soak into the oily bread and finish my sandwich with some mild goat cheese crumbled on top to add some fresh milkiness.

Beetroot + Goat Cheese Fougasse Sandwich

I made 3 flatbread sandwiches with 3 small beetroots peeled and cut into very thin slices and mixed with 3 tablespoons of olive oil and 2 tablespoons of maple syrup. I seasoned the roots with salt and pepper, mixed them with a few sprigs of thyme and roasted them spread in a roasting tin for 12 minutes in the hot oven set to 220°C / 430°F (Rotitherm roasting setting) until they were soft.

If you don’t want to make your own Orange Sage Fougasse bread (I can just recommend it as it’s fantastic), you can also use focaccia or soft buns (I made some very soft and juicy Mountain Buns with spices a couple months ago). I cut the flatbread in half, drizzled some olive oil (generously) on one side and spread the roast beetroot slices on top. After I sprinkled them with goat cheese (for 3 sandwiches I used 100g / 3.5 ounces of cheese), some fresh thyme leaves, salt and pepper, I closed my Fougasse sandwich, pleased about another great sweet root variation!

Beetroot + Goat Cheese Fougasse Sandwich

 

Beetroot + Goat Cheese Fougasse Sandwich

 

Beetroot + Goat Cheese Fougasse Sandwich

Fougasse Bread with Orange, Sage and Olive Oil

Orange + Sage Fougasse

It’s time to bake bread again! I use a recipe which involves sage and my beloved blood oranges, they’ll be out of season soon, so I’m using every possible occasion that allows me to cook or bake with my sweet citrus fruits. I mix generous amounts of their zest and juice into the dough and the result is impressive!

My bread is a light and aromatic Fougasse, a French flatbread very popular in Provence where it’s often made with olives, herbs and cheese. It’s similar to the Italian Focaccia but with a leaf pattern of cuts in the dough. In some recipes, the cut goes all the way through creating holes in the bread while it’s baking which makes the bread harder. I prefer to leave mine juicy with shallow cuts on the surface. Besides the orange and sage I add good olive oil in and on the bread. I use the wonderful extra virgin olive oil from the Molise region which I got from Marilena. Its strong and fruity taste is just what my Mediterranean flatbread needs!

I already have a great idea for a sandwich I can make with this bread for tomorrow’s Sandwich Wednesday!

Orange + Sage Fougasse

Fougasse with Orange, Sage and Olive Oil

For 6 flatbreads you need

plain flour 400g / 14 ounces
(I use spelt flour type 630 but you can use any other plain flour)
dry yeast 1 package for 500g / 1 pound flour
salt 1 teaspoon
sage, chopped, 8-10 leaves
zest of 1 medium sized orange
freshly squeezed blood orange or orange juice 100ml
water, lukewarm, 100ml
olive oil 5 tablespoons plus more for brushing the bread
organic egg 1

Combine the flour, yeast, salt, orange zest and sage in a large bowl. Add the water, orange juice and egg and mix with your dough hooks for 5 minutes. On a floured surface, continue kneading with your hands for a few minutes until you have an elastic dough ball. Put the dough back into the bowl and cover with a tea towel. Let the dough rise in a 35°C / 95°F warm oven for 45 minutes. This works really well but make sure that your oven is set to top/ bottom heat and not to fan.

Take the dough out and punch it down. Divide it into 6 pieces and roll them out into egg shaped discs (on a floured working surface, around 1 1/2 cm /  1/2″ thick). Put them on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper, cover with a tea towel and let them rise for 20 minutes.

Set your oven to 210°C / 410°F.

Brush the flatbread with olive oil and cut a pattern of 6-8 diagonal slashes into the dough to make a leaf pattern. Bake the flatbread on the lowest level for 12-15 minutes or until golden brown. Take them out and let them cool for 2 minutes.

I cut the warm flatbread in half and drizzled some more olive oil over it, it merged perfectly with the orange and sage aromas!

Orange + Sage Fougasse

 

Orange + Sage Fougasse

 

Ginger Honey glazed Navet Steaks with Orange Juice and Rosemary

Ginger Honey Root Steaks

When I saw these beautiful yellow turnips, also known as Navet, at the store, I had to buy them although I wasn’t really sure what to cook with them. They are related to beetroot but taste more like rutabaga. After 1 or 2 days of looking at them I found my inspiration, thick Navet steaks fried in butter with ginger, honey, orange juice and rosemary. I made a similar recipe with rutabaga in December and the combination of turnip and ginger is one that I like a lot.

This time, I wanted to add a few more aromas, the sweetness of honey, the fruity sourness of orange juice and some woody rosemary, all this combined in the buttery juices of my yellow turnip. The result left me speechless! I couldn’t get enough of this sauce, so thick, sweet, spicy and sour, simply amazing, and the Navet steaks covered in this sticky glaze combined perfectly with all the different flavours.

Ginger Honey Root Steaks

Ginger Honey glazed Navet Roots with Orange Juice and Rosemary

For a lunch or side dish for 2 you need

yellow turnip, cut into thick steaks, 2
(you can also use rutabaga)
ginger, grated, a thumbnail sized piece
honey, 1 teaspoon
orange juice for deglazing
rosemary, chopped, 2 tablespoons
butter 3 tablespoons
salt and black pepper

In a large pan, heat the butter together with the honey and ginger, add the turnip and season with salt and pepper. On medium heat, fry for 2-3 minutes on each side until golden brown. Deglaze with a splash of orange juice, let it cook for 1-2 minutes and sprinkle with rosemary.

Ginger Honey Root Steaks

Blood Orange Cake

Blood Orange Cake

Two things led to this cake, firstly, I haven’t written about blood oranges in more than two weeks, secondly, my mother. She reads (nearly) everything I share on eat in my kitchen, she is my mother after all. She recently mentioned that my photos could do with some new decoration. She’s a woman of action, so within a few days she sent me a parcel packed with some pots, silver plates and a selection of her favourite linen from an artisan weaver in the Italian Dolomite Alps. I’m not really a big decorator, I’m more of a minimalist but I’m open to some inspiration, especially when it comes from my mother.

The package arrived, with beautiful handwoven craftsman’s work, a table cloth and runners in various colours and designs. One of them caught my attention, a golden yellow design, a bit more frilly than my usual style but I liked it. I knew it would need to be paired with the right food to unfold its beauty. The inspiration came within a split second, a spongy blood orange cake with sugared slices on top, a bit opulent and the fruits are also from Italy, like the cloth.

Blood Orange Cake

Blood Orange Cake

For this recipe you need a 24cm x 10,5cm / 9.5″ x 4″  loaf tin.

butter, soft, 180g / 6.5 ounces
sugar 180g / 6.5 ounces
organic eggs 3
blood orange zest 2 tablespoons
freshly squeezed blood orange juice 3 tablespoons
flour 210g / 7.5 ounces
baking powder 1 teaspoon

one blood orange, cut into very thin slices, for the topping
sugar 50g / 2 ounces, for the topping
water 2 tablespoons, for the topping

icing sugar 2 tablespoons, for the syrup
freshly squeezed blood orange juice 4 tablespoons, for the syrup

Set the oven to 160°C / 320°F (fan-assisted oven) and line your loaf tin with parchment paper.

For the topping, cook the orange slices, sugar and water in a sauce pan on high temperature for around 5 minutes until the water has evaporated. Put aside.

Mix the butter together with the sugar till fluffy. Add the eggs, one at a time, and continue mixing for a couple minutes. Mix the orange juice and zest into the mixture, gently fold in the flour combined with baking powder and scoop into your prepared tin.

Bake for 35 minutes, take it out and arrange the sugared orange slices on top. Bake for another 15 minutes. Check with a skewer, it should come out clean.

Mix the icing sugar with 4 tablespoons of blood orange juice for the syrup and pour over the cake (you can spike the top of the cake).

Blood Orange Cake

 

Blood Orange Cake

 

Blood Orange Cake

A juicy treat with orange, turmeric and ginger

Orange+ Turmeric + Ginger Juice

Today’s post is dedicated to all my friends who have a cold – unfortunately, quite a few at the moment. I would love to have them all over to nurse them, so I decided to come up with a tasty and healthy juice, full of vitamins and powerful roots to give them a recipe that will strengthen them again!

My current favourite, the blood orange, is as important to this juice as freshly grated turmeric and ginger roots. Turmeric is a great helper when your body suffers from inflammations, be it in the throat, the ears or your tummy. This root has an important role in the Ayurveda philosophy and is assumed to have a big effect on our cells like ginger which is an antiseptic boost to the immune system.

If you feel well and strong – which I hope you all are – then you can just enjoy this wonderful juice and its spicy, fruity taste. And anyways, prevention is better than cure.

For 1 big glass of this powerful drink, you will need around 350ml of freshly squeezed orange juice (I used 6 of my blood oranges), 1/8 teaspoon of freshly grated turmeric root and 1/4 teaspoon of freshly grated ginger. I bought the turmeric in a small organic shop around the corner but you can find it in lots of Asian shops as well.

Drink it, enjoy, and get well soon!

Orange+ Turmeric + Ginger Juice

 

Orange+ Turmeric + Ginger Juice

Wintery Sunday Morning Muffins with Blood Orange Marmalade

Sunday Morning Muffin

Sunday morning is made for muffins. They combine the spongy feeling of  a cake with the handiness of a cookie and they don’t take much longer to make than pancakes. You don’t even need an electric mixer. You combine everything with a spoon to a lumpy dough, fill the tray and within 12 minutes you’ll have warm little muffins on your breakfast table. It can’t get any better on a Sunday morning!

This recipe doesn’t need many ingredients, you might already have them at home if you like baking. I mix some of my blood orange marmalade into the dough which you can easily replace with bitter orange marmalade (that’s what I normally do) or with plum jam or any other jam that fits to cinnamon and nutmeg as I add these two spices as well. These muffins are light and fluffy, I love them warm, tear them in half and let their wintery aroma fill the air!

Sunday Morning Muffin

Sunday Morning Muffins with Marmalade and Cinnamon

You need a muffin tray with 12 molds and paper baking cups

Set your oven to 200°C / 390°F

plain flour 200g / 7 ounces
sugar 70g / 2.5 ounces plus 1 teaspoon for the topping
baking powder 2 1/2 teaspoons
baking soda 1/2 teaspoon
cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon plus 1/2 teaspoon for the topping
a pinch of nutmeg
a pinch of salt
milk 160ml
butter, melted, 50g / 2 ounces
organic egg 1
blood orange marmalade 1 1/2 – 2 tablespoons
(or bitter orange marmalade or plum jam)

Combine the dry ingredients in a large bowl. Mix the melted butter, the milk, egg and marmalade. Pour the liquid mixture into the dry mixture and stir with a wooden spoon until you have a lumpy dough. The more you mix it the more it will lose its light texture so don’t mix it too long.

Fill the muffin tray. Combine the sugar and cinnamon for the topping, sprinkle on top and bake for 12 minutes or until golden.

Sunday Morning Muffin